login   |    register

Scale Modeling Sponsors

See Your Ad Here!

11
A Walk Around The Big J

  • move


13 - Today, people marvel at the few remaining sailing ships (or tall ships, as they're better known), and see a whole bunch of ropes that they can't possibly figure out. Well, along those same lines, here's a picture of a whole bunch of cabling in the overhead - it looks like a mess, but everything has a purpose.

14 - The admiral's cabin. If I understood the docent correctly, New Jersey was not built to be a flagship; the admiral's cabin was an afterthought. And it shows, too: the captain's cabin is much bigger, and better appointed. In the captain's cabin, there was a poster indicating that by "custom and tradition", the captain would usually eat alone, or have one or two invited guests. I guess Hollywood has it wrong! The docent told me that the XO ran the wardroom, allowing the captain some privacy.

15 - The top of a dual 5" gun mount. This mount was on the starboard side, looking forward. That's the Ben Franklin Bridge in the background; Philadelphia is on the left-hand side of the river.

16 - I can't say for sure, but I guess when I took the picture of the 5" mount, I was up on the 03 level.

17 - Looking up at the yardarm; the ropes are for the signal flags. The cables in the bottom left of the image are radio antennas.

18 - Looking at the top of turret #2. I think this picture is taken from the port side bridge, where the captain had his chair.

19 - Inside the "battle conn". This is the 04 level, frame 85.

20 - Another view of the battle conn. The "periscope" in the upper left is interesting - there was one on the starboard side, also.

21 - The steel door into the conn.

22 - View into the conn, through one of the multiple slits in the armor. Notice the periscope on the left of the image - this is the periscope that would be located on the starboard side of the conn.

23 - View into the conn, from the starboard side.

24 - An explanation of the battle conn - sorry it's sideways, but it was the only way to get all the text into 1 image.

25 - Another top view of turrets 1 & 2.

26 - The Phalanx Gatling Gun, or Close-In Weapons System (C-wiz).

27 - Close-up of the feed mechanism for the Phalanx. It looked like the spent casing would fall into a hole in the bottom of the tapered surface under the gun, but I couldn't get "tall enough" to look down in there.

28 & 29 - The Tomahawk missile launcher.

30 & 31 - A look inside one of the 5" mounts. The bottom of the opening into the turret was about chin high on me (and I'm 6'-1"), and there was a replica casing and shell on the platform just inside the turret, so it was hard to get the camera angled in, as well as just trying to tell what I was looking at. Even though there was some lighting inside, I just couldn't get a good feel for what I was looking at. However, this particular mount was dedicated to the Marine detachments that had been aboard.

32 - I was taken with how spacious the galley area was. Here, on the left, is a concession stand that wasn't open/in operation (a menu was posted, but it didn't look like anybody had cooked in there in a while).

33 - 2nd deck, frame 151. I don't recall the rest of the nomenclature; I guess I need to look it up in my Bluejacket's manual!

34 - This picture should be rotated 90 degrees to the right; it was just a bunch of valves tucked away in a corner.

20 - From under the main battery.

With regards to the NJ, one thing I wanted to mention is that the teak decking is in sad shape. There are a lot of holes in the planks (usually where one end meets another end) - probably due to rot. While I was there, they had some new planks set out to make some repairs on the deck. There was an exhibit on board showing that just one piece of teak planking cost $111 (and the plank was about 2" thick, 3+" wide, and maybe 7' long).

Model Shipwrights would like to thank Tim Parker for providing these pictures of his visit to the USS New Jersey Battleship!
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move

About the Author

About Timothy E. Parker (pzkw)
FROM: , UNITED STATES


Comments

Tip: Just hit enter to sumbit your reply!