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Tamiya mix ratio?
STLDALE
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Posted: Monday, September 18, 2017 - 10:18 AM GMT+7
What is a good recipe for mixing to use with an airbrush?
Kevlar06
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Posted: Monday, September 18, 2017 - 01:27 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text

What is a good recipe for mixing to use with an airbrush?



It depends on what type of coverage you want. I like to start out with a Tamiya basecoat of paint, sprayed over a good primer, mixed at about 40% paint to 60% thinner at 12-15 PSI. But it also depends on the color density, for example, I go 50/50 when using lighter colors like white, yellows, tans or light grays. But when doing detail work I like to go about 30% paint to 70% thinner, especially for fine lines and motles, which I usually spray at 8-12 PSI.
VR, Russ
RussianArmor
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Posted: Monday, September 18, 2017 - 11:30 PM GMT+7
Actually, if you go look at Andy's Hobby Headquarters' YouTube channel, he has a way that perfectly thins Tamiya paint for airbrushing - no measuring required. Just take a new 23ml bottle and fill it up to the upper lip on the jar with the X20A thinner. Close and shake. Perfectly thinned bottle of paint.
I've been using this method for a while and have not had a single issue with the paint being too thick or thin. And it still brushes on fine.
j76lr
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Posted: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 02:06 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Actually, if you go look at Andy's Hobby Headquarters' YouTube channel, he has a way that perfectly thins Tamiya paint for airbrushing - no measuring required. Just take a new 23ml bottle and fill it up to the upper lip on the jar with the X20A thinner. Close and shake. Perfectly thinned bottle of paint.
I've been using this method for a while and have not had a single issue with the paint being too thick or thin. And it still brushes on fine.



I use this method too, with no problems. before this as a rule of thumb , i used 50-50 thinned with alcohol.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 04:36 AM GMT+7
I couldn't find it on the website mentioned-- can you post a link? I suspect this method uses the entire bottle, which will then render it useless for other applications, but I'd like to know if that's true.
VR, Russ
TotemWolf
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Posted: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 06:19 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

I couldn't find it on the website mentioned-- can you post a link? I suspect this method uses the entire bottle, which will then render it useless for other applications, but I'd like to know if that's true.
VR, Russ



I have hand painted with thinned Tamiya before. It works just fine. Tamiya is not the best paint for hand painting anyway so it's not that much different.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 07:16 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

I couldn't find it on the website mentioned-- can you post a link? I suspect this method uses the entire bottle, which will then render it useless for other applications, but I'd like to know if that's true.
VR, Russ



I have hand painted with thinned Tamiya before. It works just fine. Tamiya is not the best paint for hand painting anyway so it's not that much different.



Hand painting isn't what I was referring to- once you mix any paint, it's mixed forever in that ratio. If you want it to be thinner, you'll end up diluting it even more if you add more thinner. So if you want a certain effect, or change your air pressure requirement, you may not be able to use that mixed paint. And if you need to thicken it, it's like putting toothpaste back into the tube-- you can't really return it to the manufacturers specs to get it thicker. So once you add thinner to any bottle of paint, that's the consistency of the paint you're going to have to live with. That's why most professional painters and artists try and mix thier paints in a separate container. However-- I haven't been able to see the video, so I don't know what this guy is doing-- I found a lot on his website, but not the Tamiya mixing guide.
VR, Russ
RussianArmor
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Posted: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 07:23 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

I couldn't find it on the website mentioned-- can you post a link? I suspect this method uses the entire bottle, which will then render it useless for other applications, but I'd like to know if that's true.
VR, Russ



Here is a link to the YouTube video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4Xv3ZPtJ2Q

It's around the 4:40 mark in the video.

And yes, the entire bottle will be mixed at that ratio forever. If you need multiple mixed ratios, then this method isn't for you.

The OP asked about mixing for use in an airbrush, for which this method works just fine without having to measure ratios.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 07:53 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

The OP asked about mixing for use in an airbrush, for which this method works just fine without having to measure ratios.




Ok, I watched the video. And it's as I thought, he's mixed the entire bottle in one ratio, which makes the entire bottle useful for only one style of airbrushing-- and will change the paint chemistry in the bottle-- which most manufacturers don't recommend. Fine lines, mottling, elimination of overspray, and finely feathered edges may be more difficult to obtain with that single mix, not to mention the paint may become less useful over time. There are painless methods for mixing paint in proper ratios which don't affect the entire bottle. I personally like to use small clear plastic ml cups for mixing-- the type in which medicines are dispensed in hospitals. I pour in the paint I need to the appropriate ml marker, and add the amount of required thinner with a pipette, then just pour into the AB cup. These cups can be purchased through Micro-Mark or Model Expo a hundred at a pop- which means I can clean them or toss them if necessary. For Andy's one method, there are ten others on you-tube that recommend mixing Tamiya and other paints in separate containers.
VR, Russ
Jeff8600
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Posted: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 - 05:16 AM GMT+7
For the best results with Tamiya paints I stopped using their thinner. I use Mr. Leveling Thinner and it works great. It is much smoother. I also do a bout 1:1 paint to thinner but you might have to experiment a bit to get what you like.
retiredyank
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Posted: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 - 09:18 PM GMT+7
After having tried XA acryl thinner, Tamiya lacquer thinner, distilled water and isopropyl alcohol, I find Mr. Leveling Thinner works best. I usually reduce the paint 2:3 or 1:1(paint:thinner) and spray at 15-20psi. I also mix, in bottle. But, I have two bottles of most colors. This slots one bottle for a single type of use. However, you can change the chemistry by adding undiluted paint to the mix.