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Tool Review
Leaking & Stains, Grime & Damp
Leaking & Stains, Grime & Damp Matt & Semi-Gloss
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by: Frederick Boucher [ JPTRR ]


_ORGINPUB:
KitMaker Network

Introduction
Leaking & Stains, Grime & Damp is a satin and glossy paint set from LifeColor. It is set CS39. This set was kindly provided for review by Airbrushes.com, which narrates on their site:
    Water soluble acrylic colours for modelling and hobby. LifeColor is excellent for paint brushing or airbrushing on plastic, resin, metal, vinyl, wood, cloth and ceramic.

    This set contains both matt and gloss acrylic colours. There are 3 special glossy acrylic colours to simulate damp and mould effects for dioramas. Plus 3 matt acrylic colours to replicate grime details.

As much as I enjoy rusting and corroding surfaces I also enjoy mucking up things with moss, algae, and mold. Please note the photos of moss in the lawn and on the tree, and mosses, algae and mold on brick and siding. These paints can be used on buildings, groundwork, and even to detail ponds and watercourses on your layouts and dioramas. Lets go create some deterioration!

The Set
This set of six 22ml screw top bottles is packed in a good looking flip-top box.
Multilingual text on the back of the box explains how to use these paints.

The bottle caps are molded with an internal rim which both provides a small palette cup as well as inhibits paint fouling of the bottle cap thread.

These water soluble acrylic paints are made with very fine ground pigments for use on plastic, resin, metal, vinyl, wood, cloth and ceramic. They have no noticeable odor. I find them to be much thinner than other brands I am used to, more like a wash than a paint. They are formulated for airbrushing instead of one-pass brushing. Multiple brushed layers increase the depth and intensity of the effects.

Except for on-line there are no instructions other than examples printed on the box, plus graphics identifying the six bottles. Lifecolor reminds us that these can be mixed with their Tensocrom Medium to create washes and glazes.

This set includes:
    UA 746 Lime Green
    UA 747 Dirty Green
    UA 748 Brown Green
    UA 749 Vegetable Origin Damp Green
    UA 750 Vegetable Origin Damp Yellow
    UA 751 Dark Mould


The last three have a good dank semi-gloss to them. The images of the six circles of color show them wet and dry, in natural (overcast) and artificial light.

Application
These paints are formulated for both airbrushing and hand brushing. I did not airbrush any of these although they would be very easy to spray.

Bristle brushing is somewhat different. As noted above these are much thinner than conventional paints. However, the glossy medium of three colors make them tacky to the touch until they dry. None of the colors left brushstrokes. None of the colors ran nor puddled. They dry with an appropriate finish.

To demonstrate these products I painted a cardstock and wood goat sty by Model Scene, a Rusty Rail resin casting, and a plaster casting. Application was with a variety of brushes ranging from cheap craft stiff bristle acrylic types through soft camel hair artist brands.

adhesion
Excellent! Due to the subjects I painted it is not practical to test it with tape.

Conclusion
LifeColor Leaking & Stains, Grime & Damp is a very versatile set to weather buildings and create flora effects for groundwork and watercourses on your layouts and dioramas. The colors replicate the mosses, algae, and mold I see just outside my window, as well as on structures around the railyard, and elsewhere. The paints provide realistic colors with good consistency. They mix together easily affording a modeler virtually an endless range of colors. No doubt these can be mixed with other LifeColor colors and pigments for even more effects.

I do not have anything meaningful to complain about and happily recommend this set.

Thanks to Airbrushes.com for providing this set. Please remember to mention to them and LifeColor that you saw this paint set here - on KitMaker Network.
SUMMARY
Highs: Realistic colors. Good consistency. Very versatile.
Lows: De minimis.
Verdict: Very versatile set to weather buildings and create flora effects for groundwork and watercourses on your layouts and dioramas.
  Scale: N/A
  Mfg. ID: CS39
  Related Link: 
  PUBLISHED: Mar 18, 2018
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 87.03%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 89.44%

Our Thanks to Airbrushes.com!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Frederick Boucher (JPTRR)
FROM: TENNESSEE, UNITED STATES

I'm a professional pilot with a degree in art. My first model was an AMT semi dump truck. Then Monogram's Lunar Lander right after the lunar landing. Next, Revell's 1/32 Bf-109G...cried havoc and released the dogs of modeling! My interests--if built before 1900, or after 1955, then I proba...

Copyright 2018 text by Frederick Boucher [ JPTRR ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Model Shipwrights. All rights reserved.



Comments

Looks like a nice very useful set. Thank you for the review Fred. Randy
MAR 18, 2018 - 01:43 PM
Thirty-nine bucks seems like a lot to pay for something that anyone, with even just a minimum of talent could accomplish with some regular paints and pigments. After reading about scale effects, distances, natural/artificial light, fading, etc., why do manufacturers continue to try to sell us expensive stuff that's really not needed?
JUL 01, 2018 - 06:49 AM
I have to agree, with Doug. I do have some washes and filters, bought to see how they operate.
JUL 01, 2018 - 07:28 AM
We broke our quick reply box. Working on it. Until fixed go to topic to reply.
Thanks.
   

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